Hazards for your pets

As pet parents, it's important that we keep our pets safe but unfortunately hazards can present in unusual situations. We've listed some common hazards for you to keep an eye out for. 

Toxic Plants

Many common weeds and plants are toxic for pets, prevention by removing from your backyard and avoiding where is possible is best - however if your pet has ingested a plant from the below list or you suspect that they have, bring them into your nearest Animates Vetcare clinic as soon as possible. Always try to bring a sample of the plant for ease of identification and treatments. 

Toxic plants include:

  • Aloe Vera
  • Azalea/ Rhododendron
  • Gypsophila: Baby's Breath
  • Carnations
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Daffodils
  • Ivy - the foliage is more toxic than the fruit
  • Lilies
  • Ipomoea: Morning Glory
  • Tomato Plants 
  • Tulips

Certain plants can also be toxic to cats and dogs, but often will simply cause discomfort and mild indigestion, in other cases the toxicity can lead to more severe health problems. It is recommended to check what plants are suitable and safe for your home before bringing them inside, or if they should be kept high out of pet's reach. Cats especially need to be considered, since they can jump to high shelves. If your cat is a known plant chewer, you will probably be better off choosing imitation plants. 

Outside or Garden Hazards

Compost, fertilisers and pesticides 
Pets, in particular dogs, love investigating interesting smells in the garden, particularly when there are blood and bone fertilisers (ground animal prodcust) or food smells in compost bins, most fertilisers and pesticides contain chemicals which are poisonous to your pets. Mouldy food in compost bins also contain harmful toxins. 

Symptoms

  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting or diarrhoea
  • Increased breathing and heart rate
  • Salivation
  • Inco-ordination
  • Muscle tremors or convulsions
  • Loss of consciousness 

If your pet is showing symptoms or you suspect they have been exposed to toxins it is vital that you take them to your local veterinarian immediately. Do not wait for symptoms to develop.

Rodent bait
Rat posioning occurs when a dog becomes exposed to Bromethalin or zinc phosphide, toxins which are commonly in rodent poison. Pets can get bait poisoning by ingesting directly or by eating a rodent that has ingested the poison.

Symptoms

  • Foul breath
  • Pale gums
  • Rapid or difficulty breathing
  • Vomiting with blood
  • Nose bleeds or continued bleeding from small wounds
  • Bruising 
  • Weakness\Seizures or convulsions
  • Lethargy

If your pet is showing these symptoms or you suspect they have been exposed to rodent bait it is vital that you take them to your local veterinarian immediately. Do not wait for thee symptoms to develop. 

Slug Bait
Metaldehyde is a common ingredient in slug bait which is extremely toxic to animals if ingested. Unfortunately many pets are attracted to these baits due to the palatable ingrediants. Poisoning is particulary common in cats, dogs and chickens.

Symptoms

  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting or diarrhoea 
  • Increased breathing and heart rate 
  • Salivation 
  • Inco-ordination
  • Muscle tremors or convulsions
  • Loss of consciousness

If your pet is showing these symptoms or you suspect they have been exposed to slug bait it is vital that you take them to your local veterinarian immediately. Do not wait for symptoms to develop. If you have the packaged bait take this with you or if possible find out the name and ingredients of the bait. 

To read about common safety tips for your pet during summer, visit our 'summer safety tips' article:
https://animatesvetcare.co.nz/...